A letter from Robert Glazer Founder & CEO, Acceleration Partners From United States to me I will introduce this week as well

CC9BFCB7-6451-4167-890E-A6B286A771B9.jpeg



A letter from Robert Glazer Founder & CEO, Acceleration Partners From United States to me I will introduce this week as well



Sound Decisions - 5/20/22

Imagine a conversation between a parent and their teenage child at the breakfast table about the teenager’s behavior after a party the night before.

Parent: “How did you get home last night?”

Teenager: “I drove home.”

Parent: “But didn’t you say you were drunk?”

Teenager: “Yes, I was. But I didn’t get pulled over and I didn’t hit anyone.”

Parent: “Then it sounds like everything worked out fine—good decision, you clearly know your limits.”

If you’re a parent, this hypothetical may have spiked your blood pressure. Opposing drunk driving is as close to a universal opinion as you’ll find these days, and I want to believe that no parent would consider the avoidance of an accident or arrest to be justification for the decision to drive drunk.

As outrageous as this hypothetical discussion is, a less extreme version of it takes place in almost every organization on a regular basis.

This type of scenario was a topic in my recent interview with General Stanley McChrystal. McChrystal, a retired four-star general, New York Times bestselling author and leadership expert, shared an interesting philosophy on decision-making in relation to process and outcome.

McChrystal argued that far too many leaders evaluate whether a decision was good based solely on the outcome of the decision, rather than whether the decision-maker made the best possible choice with the information available at the time. When we evaluate decisions based solely on the outcome, we often ignore factors such as luck and timing, which can play crucial roles in the results we get.

A great example of this comes from one of the most famous leaders of the 20th century—Bill Gates. In 1980, just five years into Microsoft’s existence, a prospective client approached Gates asking him to build an operating system (OS) for their new personal computer. Gates hadn’t built an OS before, so he referred the prospect to a competitor named Digital Research.

Ultimately, the prospect was unable to reach a deal with Digital Research, so they returned to Gates and asked again for Microsoft’s services. Given a second chance, Gates agreed to build the OS for the prospect.

The prospect was IBM, and their years-long partnership with Microsoft launched Gates’ company into the stratosphere of the computing world. Were it not for a stroke of luck, Gates and Microsoft would’ve lost out on a company-changing deal.

If someone were to evaluate Gates’ initial decision to refer IBM to a competitor based solely on the eventual outcome, they might draw the wrong conclusion. Had Digital Research reached an agreement to build the OS for IBM, they, rather than Microsoft, may have become the giants of the software development world. Gates himself probably would admit that good luck saved him from a bad decision.

When evaluating a decision after the fact, it’s crucial to remember two important concepts.

When your team or organization faces an identical or similar decision repeatedly, it’s especially important to avoid focusing on individual results and instead look at the outcomes in the aggregate. For example, if your organization’s data indicates that taking a certain course of action has a favorable outcome 95 percent of the time, you shouldn’t abandon that process or question the decision after one of the few times it has a poor outcome. Extreme outcomes tend to regress to the mean over time.
Conversely, a frequent poor decision-making framework is the celebration of exceptions. When someone uses a low-probability outcome as a case study to guide or justify future decisions, they are learning the wrong lessons. For example, if data indicates that employees who accept counteroffers leave the organization within a year 90 percent of the time, deciding to make a counteroffer by pointing to a case where it worked out is pursuing a course proven to have a low probability of a good outcome. The organization is better off sticking to a decision-making rule of refusing to make counteroffers to dodge the 90 percent failure rate.
If you want leaders in your organizations to consistently make good decisions, don’t simply assume that the quality of an outcome indicates the quality of an underlying decision. It’s better to look under the hood of the decision itself, get a sense of the information available at the time and consider the role luck or timing may have played. Organizations that constantly evaluate their decision-making processes regardless of the outcomes are the ones that make better decisions in the future.

For a deeper dive into this topic, it’s definitely a good decision to check out my interview with General McChrystal on the Elevate Podcast.

Quote of the Week:

“Focus on the process, not the result.” – Author Unknown

Have a great weekend!

Robert Glazer
Founder & Chairman of the Board, Acceleration Partners

If you found this note helpful, I would love if you could forward and share it with someone who needs the inspiration today: Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn


健全な決定-5/20/22

前夜のパーティーの後のティーンエイジャーの行動について、朝食のテーブルで親と10代の子供の間の会話を想像してみてください。

親:「昨夜はどうやって家に帰ったの?」

ティーンエイジャー:「私は家に帰りました。」

親:「でも、酔っ払っているとは言わなかったの?」

ティーンエイジャー:「はい、そうです。 しかし、私は引っ張られず、誰にもぶつかりませんでした。」

親:「それなら、すべてがうまくいったように聞こえます。良い決断です。あなたは自分の限界をはっきりと知っています。」

あなたが親である場合、この仮説はあなたの血圧を急上昇させた可能性があります。 飲酒運転に反対することは、最近のように普遍的な意見に近いものであり、事故や逮捕の回避を飲酒運転の決定の正当化と見なす親はいないと私は信じたいと思います。


この架空の議論はとんでもないことですが、それほど極端ではないバージョンが、ほぼすべての組織で定期的に行われています。



このタイプのシナリオは、スタンリー・マクリスタル将軍との最近のインタビューで話題になりました。



引退した4つ星の将軍であり、ニューヨークタイムズのベストセラー作家でありリーダーシップの専門家であるマクリスタルは、プロセスと結果に関する意思決定に関する興味深い哲学を共有しました。



マクリスタルは、意思決定者がその時点で入手可能な情報を使用して可能な限り最善の選択をしたかどうかではなく、決定の結果のみに基づいて決定が適切であったかどうかを評価するリーダーが多すぎると主張しました。



結果のみに基づいて決定を評価する場合、得られる結果に重要な役割を果たす可能性のある運やタイミングなどの要因を無視することがよくあります。



この良い例は、20世紀の最も有名なリーダーの1人であるビルゲイツからのものです。



マイクロソフトの存在からわずか5年後の1980年に、見込み客がゲイツに近づき、新しいパーソナルコンピュータ用のオペレーティングシステム(OS)を構築するように依頼しました。



ゲイツ氏はこれまでOSを構築したことがなかったため、見込み客をDigitalResearchという名前の競合他社に紹介しました。



最終的に、見込み客はDigital Researchと契約を結ぶことができなかったため、Gatesに戻り、Microsoftのサービスを再度要求しました。



2回目のチャンスを与えられて、ゲイツは見込み客のためにOSを構築することに同意しました。



見込み客はIBMであり、Microsoftとの長年にわたるパートナーシップにより、Gatesの会社はコンピューティングの世界の成層圏に参入しました。



運が悪ければ、ゲイツ氏とマイクロソフト社は会社を変える契約に負けていただろう。



誰かが最終的な結果のみに基づいてIBMを競合他社に紹介するというゲイツの最初の決定を評価した場合、彼らは間違った結論を引き出す可能性があります。



Digital ResearchがIBM用のOSを構築することに合意した場合、MicrosoftではなくIBMがソフトウェア開発の世界の巨人になった可能性があります。



ゲイツ自身は、幸運が彼を悪い決断から救ったことをおそらく認めるでしょう。



事後に決定を評価するときは、2つの重要な概念を覚えておくことが重要です。

チームまたは組織が同じまたは類似の決定に繰り返し直面する場合、個々の結果に焦点を合わせるのを避け、代わりに全体の結果を見ることが特に重要です。たとえば、組織のデータが、特定の行動方針をとることが95%の確率で好ましい結果をもたらすことを示している場合、そのプロセスを放棄したり、結果が悪いことが数回あった後に決定に疑問を投げかけたりしないでください。極端な結果は、時間の経過とともに平均に回帰する傾向があります。
逆に、頻繁に行われる不十分な意思決定の枠組みは、例外を祝うことです。誰かが将来の決定を導くまたは正当化するための事例研究として確率の低い結果を使用するとき、彼らは間違った教訓を学んでいます。たとえば、カウンターオファーを受け入れる従業員が1年以内に90%の確率で組織を離れることをデータが示している場合、それがうまくいった事例を指摘してカウンターオファーを作成することを決定することは、良い確率が低いことが証明されたコースを追求することです。結果。組織は、90%の失敗率をかわすためのカウンターオファーの作成を拒否するという意思決定ルールに固執する方がよいでしょう。
組織のリーダーに一貫して適切な決定を下してもらいたい場合は、結果の質が根本的な決定の質を示していると単純に想定しないでください。決定自体の内部を調べ、その時点で入手可能な情報を把握し、運やタイミングが果たした可能性のある役割を検討することをお勧めします。結果に関係なく意思決定プロセスを絶えず評価している組織は、将来、より良い意思決定を行う組織です。

このトピックをさらに深く掘り下げるには、Elevateポッドキャストでマクリスタル将軍とのインタビューをチェックすることをお勧めします。

今週の引用:

「結果ではなく、プロセスに焦点を合わせます。」 –作成者不明

良い週末を!

ロバートグレイザー
AccelerationPartnersの創設者兼会長

このメモがお役に立てば、今日インスピレーションを必要としている人と転送して共有していただければ幸いです。 Facebook | LinkedIn


この記事へのコメント